Android

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Awesome Android eXtreme Hacking. Part III. What a Shell!

Awesome Android eXtreme Hacking Part I HeaderAwesome Android eXtreme Hacking Part I Header


NOTE
This article has already been moved to the our new blog. Please update any link to this post as it will be removed in the future. This post is available clicking the link below:

http://papermint-designs.com/dmo-blog/2016-04-awesome-android-extreme-hacking--part-iii--what-a-shell

So, you had notice we are using the shell a lot. If you are used to work on a standard UNIX shell you had also noticed that the Android command line is really limited. Well, somehow, that makes sense for a consumer electronics device like a phone. Most of the users won't ever notice that. However, us, the chosen wannabes, really want a more powerful shell on our phone.... Such a thing is possible and it is called Busybox.

Awesome Android eXtreme Hacking. Part II (Sensors)

Awesome Android eXtreme Hacking Part I HeaderAwesome Android eXtreme Hacking Part I Header


NOTE
This article has already been moved to the our new blog. Please update any link to this post as it will be removed in the future. This post is available clicking the link below:

http://papermint-designs.com/dmo-blog/2016-04-awesome-android-extreme-hacking--part-ii-sensors

Welcome back to the Awesome Android eXteme Hacking Tutorial. Hope you are ready for some more awesomeness :). In the last issue (http://papermint-designs.com/community/node/419) we learn how to create and run a C application on our Android phone. That allows you to build almost any application that does not require access to special features on your phone, in other words, pretty much any standard console based UNIX application.

Now we are going one step further hacking into your phone sensors. Yes, you phone is full of sensors and peripherals: Buttons, Touchscreen, accelerometers, gyroscopes and even temperature and pressure sensors. Android provides APIs to access those sensors from Java in a convenient way, but we want to hack into them, because that is a lot more awesome!... So, let's start.

Awesome Android eXtreme Hacking. Part I

Awesome Android eXtreme Hacking Part I HeaderAwesome Android eXtreme Hacking Part I Header


NOTE
This article has already been moved to the our new blog. Please update any link to this post as it will be removed in the future. This post is available clicking the link below:

http://papermint-designs.com/dmo-blog/2016-04-awesome-android-extreme-hacking--part-i

So you'd got here because of the catchy title?. Good luck!, you are in the right place. You had just landed in the first part of a series of awesome tutorials on how to extreme hack your Android devices. Yes it is extreme, so let's start straight away. The first thing you have to know is that... your Android phone is actually a Linux computer!. Yes, it is. And that is the reason we can do quite some amazing things just out of the box.... Interested?... Keep reading

How to access all your photos on your Samsung S4 (Internal and Sdcard)

I had just come back from a trip with hundreds of photos on my new Samsung S4. I plug it into my computer to backup them and make some room in the phone, and then I'd got this annoying dialog popping up.

Error accessing SDCard pictures on Samsung S4Error accessing SDCard pictures on Samsung S4

WEL29. Weekend Links

The usual links to have fun during the weekend (BeableBone, Raspberry Pi, Arduino,...). I never manage to do anything with them, but maybe you can.

TOPIC OF THE WEEK: BUILD YOUR OWN PHONE

Have you ever thought about building your own phone?... I have and these are some links with interesting projects others had already made.

Via Hackaday an Arduino based phone

http://www.instructables.com/id/ArduinoPhone/

Control picoFlamingo (and other stuff) from your Android Phone

Yes, thanks to NetKitty and the S2 Bluetooth Terminal, I can send commands to picoFlamingo directly from my G1 phone. In principle the BT Chat example available from the Android SDK should also work, but, at this point, I'm stuck with Android 1.5 on my G1 and the RFComm Bluetooth sockets are not available on that version.

OpenGL ES 2.0 support on latest Android NDK r3

Hi There!

After seeing the entry in OmapZoom.org news feed about a new release of the Android NDK, I checked the link, and my eyes got caught into the section OpenGL 2.0 Support.

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